Photoshop Elements

Resizing and Adding a Stroke In Photoshop Elements

for Submission to the Caveman Camera Club

Video tutorial on resizing:   Resize with Elements

Video tutorial on Adding a Stroke:  Add a Stroke

After you’re finished with any post processing (photoshopping) of your image, INCLUDING adding a stroke if desired, you’re ready to resize.

  1. Go to Image and down to Convert Color Profile.  Choose Convert to sRGB.

  2. Go back to Image, down to Resize, then over to Image Size.  Click on it.

  3. Go to Pixel Dimensions.  The image should never be more than 1024 pixels high and  no more than 1024 pixels wide.  For a horizontal image, change the Width to 1024 but don’t change the Height.  For a vertical image, change the Height to 1024 but not the Width.  A square image should be 1024 for both Width and Height, if it is truly square.

  4. Be sure all three boxes near the bottom are checked:  Scale Styles, Constrain Proportions, and Resample Image.

  5. Skip the Document Size This is for printing only.

  6. At the bottom, click Bicubic and scroll down to Bicubic Sharper (best for reduction).    Click

  7. Now go back up to File and down to Save As.

  8. At the top, be sure you are in the Folder that you want to save it in.

  9. Then go to File Name and enter as directed in the www.cavemancameraclub.com website.  For example:  YourName_CAVE_PictureName.jpg or JaneDoe_CAVE_PrettyFlower.jpg.

  10. In the middle, go to Format and click on JPEG (or jpg).

  11. Hit Save.

  12. The screen will then go to another box of JPEG Options.  If the size estimate shows more than 1024 Kb (1Mb), use the slider to decrease the quality until the size is 1024 Kb (1Mb) or less.

  13. Click OK.

When finished, send the image to the Electronic Image Coordinator as directed on the website, including instructions about which category the image is to be in (Assigned or Open).  The official guidelines are at www.cavemancameraclub.com under Learn>Prepare your Photo for Competition>Caveman Camera Club Competition Rules.

Adding a Stroke to your image

A stroke is desirable if your image has dark edges.  The stroke will outline the image to more clearly define the edges against a black projection screen.  Add the stroke BEFORE you resize.

  1. Make sure you are in Expert

  2. Hit Select – All.

  3. You should now see “marching ants” (little dashed lines) around your image.

  4. Hit Edit – Stroke (outline) selection.

  5. A box pops up – Choose the width you want (start with 3 -5 pixels).

  6. Then choose the color. Clicking on the color block brings up a color selector.  Or you can place your mouse anywhere on your image and an eye-dropper appears which allows you to choose an exact color from your image.

  7. Then in the next box, click

  8. You can experiment with the blending modes, but start with Normal 100% (default).

  9. Click OK.

  10. Now go back to Select, but this time choose Deselect. The “marching ants” are gone and your image now has a stroke around it.

  11. Now you can proceed with the resizing of your image.

Lightroom

Resize, Create a Preset & Add a Stroke with Lightroom

for Submission to the Caveman Camera Club

Video Tutorial to Resize & Create a Preset:  Resize with Preset

Video Tutorial to add a Stroke with Lightroom:  Add A Stroke

After you’ve finished post-processing your image, including adding a stroke if desired, you’re ready to resize your image.  If you are adding a stroke (using Photoshop), see the second section below.

In Lightroom you can create a preset to quickly resize your photo in the future.

How to Create A Preset:

1.  Go to File then down to Export

2.  Choose your export locations in the Export to: box on top and in the Export Location

3.  In the File Naming box, Click Rename To: and Choose Custom Name. Enter your name, FirstLast, without spaces.  Then an underscore, CAVE, and another underscore.  For example:  YourName_CAVE_ or JaneDoe_CAVE_  (When creating the preset for the first time, don’t enter the picture name.)

4.  In the File Settings box, Image Format is: jpg; Color Space is:  sRGB.  Then check Limit File Size to:  and enter 1024 Kb (1 Mb).

5. In the Image Sizing box, click Resize to Fit: and choose Width & Height.  Click the Don’t Enlarge box.   For W:  enter 1024 and for H: enter 1024.

6. In the Output Sharpening box, Click Sharpen For: and choose Screen.  Choose Amount:  Standard is OK.

7. In the Metadata, Watermarking, and Post-Processing boxes, make your choices.

8. Now go to the bottom left side and click ADD.  A box will pop up titled New Preset.  In Preset Name: Enter a name you will recognize as your Caveman Camera Club resize settings.  In Folder:  choose User Presets.  Click Create.  This will create a preset you can use to resize your photos in the future without having to enter all the choices.  You should see your new preset on the upper left under User Presets.

9. Click Export at the bottom right.

10. When finished,send the image to the Electronic Image Coordinator as directed on the website, including instructions about which category the image is to be in (Assigned or Open).  The official guidelines are at cavemancameraclub.com – under Learn>Prepare your Photo for Competition>Caveman Camera Club Competition Rules.

In the future, when you are ready to resize, just go to File: then down to Export: and click your UserPreset name.

Add the picture name (without spaces) to your preset custom name (example: YourName_CAVE_RaceCar or JaneDoe_CAVE_PrettyFlower.

Click Export and you’re all done.

To see your image on a black background, hit “L” twice.  L is for “lights out”.  Hitting “L” twice again brings you back to the edit page.

Add a Stroke using Photoshop Editor:

A stroke is desirable if your image has dark edges.  The stroke will outline the image to more clearly define the edges against a black projection screen.

  1.  Start from Library in Lightroom.
  2.  Go to Photo then drop down and click Edit In: Choose Photoshop.
  3.  Choose the first one – Edit a copy with Lightroom Adjustments. Then click Edit.
  4.  You are now in Photoshop.
  5.  Hit Select – All.
  6.  You should now see “marching ants” (little dashed lines) around your image.
  7.  Hit Edit – Stroke (outline) selection.
  8.  A box pops up – Choose the width you want (start with 3 -5 pixels).
  9.  Then choose the color. Clicking on the color block brings up a color selector.  Or you can place your cursor anywhere on your image and an eye-dropper appears which allows you to choose an exact color from your image.
  10.  Then in the next box, click
  11. You can experiment with the blending modes, but start with Normal 100% (default).
  12. Click OK.
  13. Now go back to Select, but this time choose Deselect. The “marching ants” are gone and your image now has a stroke around it.
  14. Now click File and Save (not Save As). Do not change or add anything to the name of the image.
  15. Go back to Lightroom. Your image should appear with the stroke on it.
  16.  Proceed with resizing in Lightroom using the instructions above.

 

4C’s QEID Competitions

4C’s Quarterly Electronic Image Competition

 

The 4C’s has a quarterly Electronic Image Comptetion for individuals.  You must enter the competition yourself.

You can enter up to 4 total entries in any of combination of the Traditional, Creative and Monochrome Categories and the judging will be done by a different club each quarter.

It is also helpful if you put the quarterly (spring, winter, etc.) QEID Entry in the Subject Line of the email as we use email filters to identify the entries.  (i.e.  Summer QEID Entry)

This is an individual competition which is open to 4Cs club members free of charge.  Send your entry images as email attachments to eidquarterly@columbiacameraclubs.org before the quarterly deadline.

If you are using a Mac computer please zip your entries and attached the zip file to email. More about that is addressed in the attached check list and is also listed on the 4Cs web site.

 
Columbia Council of Camera Clubs
QEID Entry Check List

To Avoid Your Entries From Being Rejected Please Read This:

Given the large number of entries in the QEID Competition, e.g. 250 plus , it is important that our competition photographers pay particular attention to the rules before entering their entries. It is very time consuming for volunteers to change file names and to communicate back and forth with photographers regarding image files that are the wrong size, or don’t provide required information, etc. Because of this issue, it is possible that your entries will be rejected and you may not get notice of this until after the closing date for the competition. It might make sense to keep a copy of the following check list near your computer to help make the QEID entry process smooth.

Please use the following check lists before sending your entries via email:
* Image file size doesn’t exceed 500k
* Vertical Measurement (top to bottom) doesn’t exceed 768 pixels
* Horizontal Measurement (side to side) doesn’t exceed 1024 pixels
* File Name doesn’t contain any spaces
* File Name doesn’t contain any hyphens “-“
* There is No Entry Number at the beginning or end of the file
* File Name is in correct naming format, e.g. FirstNameLastName_CLUB_NameOfImage_T  Note the last letter should be T for Traditional, C for Creative or M for Monochrome Categories
* If I am sending entries from a MAC computer, I have zipped the files before attaching them.
General Information:
* The images must be in jpg (jpeg) format.
* All image files must be clearly identified with the following file naming format:
A)Traditional category file names:
         i) FirstnameLastname_ClubInitials_Title_T.jpg
         (example: JohnDoe_BMPC_PrettyFlower_T.jpg)
B) Creative category file names:
         i) FirstnameLastname_ClubInitials_Title_C.jpg
         (example: JohnDoe_BMPC_PrettyFlower_C.jpg)
C) Monochrome category file names:
         i) FirstnameLastname_ClubInitials_Title_M.jpg
         (example: JohnDoe_BMPC_PrettyFlower_M.jpg)

Revised April 4, 2016

 

Critiquing Principles

Be Positive  –  Remember you are looking at someone’s pride and joy.  Always start with a positive point in the photograph, such as “you have placed the subject very well in the frame” or “the ____ leads my eye directly to the subject without any distraction.”  Then let them know what little thing might have improved the photograph, such as “I think that late evening light might have given you a richer color and looked better; don’t rush the time of day.”

Don’t Find Fault  –  Remember that you don’t have to find something wrong with the photo.  If it isn’t an above average photo, you can just let them know how it could have been improved.  Sometimes they can’t change what would have helped the photo (they can’t move a mountain or a tree), but you can ask if they could have changed the angle or location when they took the photo and explain how that would improve it.

Exposure  –  Would the photo have been better if the subject had been lighter or darker?  Explain that the subject blends into the background and would have been better if they had taken the photo at a different time of day so that the light was better.  If they wanted a silhouette, then the other areas should not have details in them.

Focus  –  Is the image sharp or was it intended to be soft?  It may be that the depth of field could have been changed to make a better photo.  Maybe a soft focus lens was used to achieve a specific mood.  Point out the benefits of using different depth of fields and how it could improve or change the photo.

Personal Bias  –  Don’t inject your personal bias into the judging and critique of the photograph.  We all know that babies and bunnies are cute, but a landscape or an abstract is just as beautiful and should be given the same respect.  This is probably the hardest thing to leave behind when you judge.  Just remember you must be fair.

Difficulty Level  –  Don’t let your personal perceived level of difficulty enter into the scoring of the photograph.

Safety  –  Don’t make comments that might encourage the photographer to take chances to improve a photo, like “Bears aren’t dangerous; you should have gotten closer.”

Images should be judged on primarily on these three elements:

Technical Quality

Exposure & lighting  –  Are areas over- or underexposed?  Is the image too light, dark, or just right?  Is the lighting too flat, too contrasty, or just right?  Does the lighting enhance or detract from the subject?  Is the time of day beneficial to the image?

Focus & depth of field  –  Is the image sharp?  If not, is it intentionally soft and successful?  Is the focus appropriate for the situation?  Does the depth of field work in this shot or should more (or less) of the photo be in focus? Is it free of scratches, dust spots, lens flares, etc?

Tonality or colors  –  In a black & white image, is there a true black and true white with a good range in between?  Is the image too gray?  Regardless, does the tonal range work for this photograph?  In color, are the colors saturated appropriately for the image, or are they too vivid or not vivid enough?  Is the white balance correct?  Is there an interesting use of primary, secondary, complementary colors?

Composition

Balance  –  Is the image aligned correctly or is it crooked?  Is the main subject in the center of the frame?  Is it on a third?  Somewhere else?  Does the chosen composition work?  Would it be better if the “weight” of the subject(s) were placed differently or if the light or dark areas were handled differently?

Design  –  Is the arrangement of the visual elements effective?  Is there a strong center of interest, pattern, or design?  Is the cropping effective, or should it have been cropped tighter or given more space (if possible)?  Is the arrangement of the visual elements effective?

Leading lines  –  Is there good use of visually interesting elements such as diagonal lines or S curves?  If applicable to the subject, does the photo have a fore, middle, and background?  Does the overall composition make you want to look deeper into the photo?  Is your eye drawn into the photo or out of it?

Emotional Appeal

Impact  –  Does the photograph get your attention and interest?  Is there a mood conveyed through the image to the viewer?  Do you like the photo?  Does it excite your imagination and have a “wow” factor?

Creativity  –  Was the photo taken at the “right” moment?  Does it show a familiar subject in a new and unusual yet effective way?  Is there an interesting creative process shown in the image?  Does it show a very unusual subject in an effective way?  Is the image artistically provocative or just a missed attempt at something different?  Is it unique and memorable?

Flash Photography

Off Camera Speedlights

by Dennis Ruga

Caveman Camera Club
April 21, 2010


The following assumes that we are using speedlights in MANUAL MODE.  

Key: When shooting with flash, we have to account for TWO separate exposures: 

  1. One for the natural light (at times, underexposed to create shadows)
  2. One for the flash exposure (used to fill the shadows)
    • F/Stop controls the flash exposure
    • Shutter speed controls the ambient light

What can I do with just ONE simple strobe?

Use it in conjunction with natural light, as the main/side/backlight

to give you nearly studio lighting and now light a subject with “two” lights. 

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Techniques to Improve your Image

–Post-Production techniques to improve your image –

by Stephen Payne

Issue: Judges often comment that there’s no central point of interest in a photo; they’re not sure what the main subject is; it’s not clear what the photo is trying to say. One solution is to reduce distractions that compete with the central point. Simplify the image by removing distractions so that the focal point jumps out and the message is clear. Several ways to do this are:
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Composition Essentials in Photography

by Gene Rimmer

Though we refer to them as rules, the following are guidelines to help photographers produce better images. Every image cannot contain every element listed here. And remember, rules can be broken and a wonderful photograph produced, but it is important to know how to take the guidelines and apply them or ignore them intelligently and purposefully. If you do not know what to look for in your image to make it better, you can’t improve on your work. Some issues are more important than others in a particular photograph. Composition essentially means a good placement or arrangement of the subject(s) of the image. The photo shows harmonious proportions and a dynamic symmetry in the placement of the most important objects plus attention to details. The following points help to explain this concept further.

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